Author Topic: Where do I get plugins?  (Read 8484 times)

Offline Biplab

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Re: Where do I get plugins?
« Reply #15 on: February 09, 2007, 05:13:38 am »
You can't compile plugins alone as they require C::B lib to link. You have to download C::B source through SVN and then compile it with that option.  :)
Be a part of the solution, not a part of the problem.

Offline Alaric

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Re: Where do I get plugins?
« Reply #16 on: February 09, 2007, 05:16:23 am »
O.k. then, now what the heck is an SVN?

Offline killerbot

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Re: Where do I get plugins?
« Reply #17 on: February 09, 2007, 09:03:15 am »
the version control system wee use for the CB sources.

See codeblocks home page -> Sources
or go to the wiki and search on nightly cookbook -> will have some explanation

Offline wxLearner

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Re: Where do I get plugins?
« Reply #18 on: February 09, 2007, 09:06:08 am »
The homepage of svn is http://subversion.tigris.org/. It's a version control system. If you want a gui, open synaptic and select rapidsvn. The svn urls for codeblocks are listed at http://developer.berlios.de/svn/?group_id=5358.

Offline mandrav

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Re: Where do I get plugins?
« Reply #19 on: February 09, 2007, 09:47:22 am »
The devpak plugin is NOT compiled in linux.
Be patient!
This bug will be fixed soon...

Offline joubertdj

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Re: Where do I get plugins?
« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2007, 10:11:20 am »
SVN stands for Subversion.

It is a tool that helps developers work on the same set of source codes without having to download the package when one single difference was made... really safes a heck of a lot of bandwidth... believe me...
It is also very useful if you make a small change and you want to contribute that change... that small change is what is usually referred to as a patch... Very nifty...

When you want the source of a project, you need to identify the URL and do a "checkout", this will then download all the files that are within that "repository". After you downloaded that initial checkout... you only have to update your repository with the URL provided (You don't need to remember the URL, SVN does that for you... cool hey!), SVN will "see" what changes was made to the server and update you, it will also "see" any changes you made so that if you screwed up somewhere, you can "revert" to the original on the server... even cooler! (I screwup allot you see! :) )

I recommend Tortoise SVN... integrates with Explorer of Windows (Don't know about Linux though, normal command SVN might be sufficient)

A small brief intro to SVN... I hope...