Author Topic: When is the next version coming out?  (Read 11905 times)

Offline raynebc

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Re: When is the next version coming out?
« Reply #45 on: November 08, 2015, 09:14:50 pm »
You should check out your own stuff before releasing it. It's not that hard.
Are you really so arrogant to think you can find all bugs in your own software without any help, or are the programs you develop simple enough for this to be achievable?  I tend to believe most serious developers DO look for bugs in their own code.  I try to find bugs in mine, but the more complicated a program is, the harder it is to eliminate all bugs.  I thoroughly comment my code, test new features and use 3 static code analysis programs (including Coverity Scan, which uses one of the leading commercial analysis tools) looking for bugs and bugs STILL happen because as a human, I am imperfect.  The more eyes there are, the faster a bug will be outed because different people use software in different ways and use different input files.  Users of commercial software contribute to a project when they buy it.  Users of open source software contribute when they use a program and report any problems they find.  If they go out of their way to try to find bugs, or submit code/patches that's even better.  If you're of the mindset that you should get a perceived bug-free IDE that has been professionally tested by a paid QA team, go back to Visual Studio.

Offline Krice

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Re: When is the next version coming out?
« Reply #46 on: November 09, 2015, 09:15:13 am »
I thoroughly comment my code, test new features and use 3 static code analysis programs (including Coverity Scan, which uses one of the leading commercial analysis tools) looking for bugs and bugs STILL happen because as a human, I am imperfect.

This is off-topic, but since you asked. The most important change for me was when I switched from C to C++ and by that I mean real C++ with proper rules like constructor-destructor paradigm, following strict ownership etc. When you eliminate the usual suspects (raw arrays, careless use of pointers, etc.) it makes the source code very rigid and reduces the possibility of bugs happening in the first place. There has been a slow, gradual change from C to C++, but even today C is often used as a base of many open source projects. Which means there are hundreds of bugs. It's the direct result of C in large scale projects, you can't avoid it. Not only that, I think C++ (object-oriented paradigm) is poorly understood and difficult to be good at, which is sad considering how powerful it can be when used the proper way.

I'm also using static code analysis tools, like CppCheck. And two compilers at the same time, VC and gcc. The final version is compiled in gcc.

Offline thomas

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Re: When is the next version coming out?
« Reply #47 on: November 09, 2015, 03:48:11 pm »
By the way, who gets the donations of this project? In some cases open source projects can get a substantial amount of money in donations, but some people never see any of it, even they can give a lot of their time and effort for the project.
The information about where that substantial amount of money goes is contained in my earlier post.

Quote
That's directly throwing the responsibility to me (and any users).
You are welcome to donate 95,000 per year, and I will take this responsibility as a full-time job, with an according service level. Until that happens, you will have to face reality, and if you are interested in getting a result (though from your shotgun-style posts I'm afraid you are really just trolling) you will need to come up with something more pragmatic than just complaining. You find a problem, report it. Or better yet, provide a solution.

As someone who claims to be experienced in software development, you will know that even given proper bug reports, it is often a challenge to reproduce and fix defects. I've had projects where nearly 50% of all reports supplied by users were either of the "what the hell is this about?" or of the "works for me" kind. Luckily, Code::Blocks is used almost exclusively by software developers (who, generally, write substantially better reports than the average end user).

Are you really so arrogant to think you can find all bugs in your own software without any help
That's a well-known and widespread psychological bias researched and published by Dunning and Kruger in the late '90s.
"We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: Premature quotation is the root of public humiliation."