Author Topic: Emacs compatibility  (Read 5010 times)

Offline Pap

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Emacs compatibility
« on: August 10, 2013, 09:19:22 pm »
Hi there,
I am using Emacs as an IDE for several years now, and I would like to switch to C::B. However, I still want to use Emacs as an editor, as I don't think common editors can offer convenient features that are standard in Emacs. Your project seems very interesting and I would like to try it. So I wonder, is there a Emacs plugin? I'm talking about either keybinding compatibility or, even better, pure Emacs support within the IDE. Such an "Emacs mode" exists in several IDES. For example, Sun (now Oracle) Studio has an Emacs keymap profile that works very well and makes Emacs users feel almost at home while using the IDE. Furthermore, Emacs support exists in Eclipse too, and, as far I know, even Visual Studio has a similar feature. As far I can tell after looking up in the forums, there isn't such an option in C::B (or I am missing a plugin here?) There is an old feature request:
http://developer.berlios.de/feature/index.php?group_id=5358&set=custom&_assigned_to=0&_status=1&_category=100&_summary_keyword=emacs&SUBMIT=Browse
for Emacs key bindings, but it is still open and assigned to none.

I guess I am not the only one asking for Emacs compatibility. There are a lot of Linux/Unix programmers that are used to the keyboard savings of Emacs (which, believe me, increases productivity a lot.) I'm pretty sure most of Emacs users would refuse to use an IDE for the improductivity it carries when typing code in a common text editor.
« Last Edit: August 11, 2013, 03:00:08 am by Pap »

Offline Wyrm

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Re: Emacs compatibility
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2013, 06:18:26 am »
You can modify your source files in any editor you like. When you switch to C::B it asks if you want to reload, answer yes. I work with VIM editor this way.
That said, real Unix guys would like VIM compatibility first before Emacs.  ;)

Offline Pap

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Re: Emacs compatibility
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2013, 11:43:51 am »
You can modify your source files in any editor you like. When you switch to C::B it asks if you want to reload, answer yes. I work with VIM editor this way.
I doubt anyone would want to work that way while developing a project. Apparently, I can try this, but it's far from being as convenient as using Eclipse or Oracle Studio, which provide true Emacs compatibility.
Anyway, my point is Emacs keymap is really missing from C::B (unless it is implemented somehow and I don't know it.) Several IDEs provide Emacs (and Vim) compatibility for a reason.

That said, real Unix guys would like VIM compatibility first before Emacs.  ;)
He he he, it's not the right place to start an "editor war", don't you think? However, suffice to say I was a vim user for years, until I decided to give Emacs a real try. Since then, I don't want to type text in any other editor - or it is an operating system? ;D

Offline jens

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Re: Emacs compatibility
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2013, 03:39:54 pm »
He he he, it's not the right place to start an "editor war", don't you think?
You are the one who started this "war"  ;) .

Nevertheless, I don't think any of our devs uses emacs for developping, so no one can make this work (if it is possible with scintilla anyway), so patches are welcome.

Offline Wyrm

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Re: Emacs compatibility
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2013, 11:44:21 pm »
I doubt anyone would want to work that way while developing a project. Apparently, I can try this, but it's far from being as convenient as using Eclipse or Oracle Studio, which provide true Emacs compatibility.
Anyway, my point is Emacs keymap is really missing from C::B (unless it is implemented somehow and I don't know it.) Several IDEs provide Emacs (and Vim) compatibility for a reason.

Several other IDEs have corporate sponsorship and have full time developers to work on them. This brings some advantages (VIM/Emacs/VS support) and disadvantages as well (they try to lock your development into their IDE and dev flow to monetize it in other ways).

You have to remember that C++ developers are expensive people and their time is expensive. For example, a quality C++ developer in the US costs you about $80K + taxes + perks, for a total of over $100K per year easily. Yeah I'd love to have feature-this and feature-that added to C::B but unless I'm willing to pay them money I can't go and request that they spend their time for the features they themselves don't need.

Open source works differently. If you really need something, you (and other people who need it) bring your own time and skills and offer to join. I'm not a C::B developer but I suppose something like this would work:
1. Check with devs if they are interested in multiple editor bindings.
2. If yes, try a quick prototype yourself to make sure it is doable and to estimate the time needed to develop production quality software.
3. Come back to C::B devs and ask about architecture to make sure you don't break any assumptions or previous design decisions.
4. Integrate their feedback, polish your code and send them your patch to enable Emacs keybindings.

Now, if you are not willing to put your own time/skills into it then you don't really need it. Why would developers want to maintain the code that you don't really need?

Disclaimer: The above is IMHO, may contain errors and unintended prejudice.